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3rd Ohio Cavalry

Online Books
3rd Ohio Cavalry Soldier Roster - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 11, by Ohio Roster Commission (Joseph B. Foraker, Governor, James S. Robinson, Sec'y of State and H. A. Axline, Adjutant-General), 1886     View Entire Book

Regimental History
Third Cavalry. Cols., Louis Zahm, James W. Paramore, Charles B. Seidel, Horace N. Howland ; Lieut.-Cols., Douglas A. Murray, Darius E. Livermore; Majs., John H. Foster, James S. Brisbin, Charles W. Skinner, Leonard Adams, Thomas D. McClelland, Martin Archer, Francis P. Gates. This regiment was organized from the state at large, at Monroeville, Huron county, from Sept. 4 to Dec. 11, 1861, to serve for three years. In March, 1862, it was ordered to Nashville, Tenn., and arrived there on the 18th. In September the 1st battalion of the regiment had a sharp engagement at Munfordville, Ky., with three times its own number and drove them into their works in three separate charges. It lost 2 killed and 12 wounded, and the enemy lost 38 killed and 60 wounded. Near Bardstown the same battalion, reinforced by two companies of the 2nd Ohio and 3d Ky. cavalry, attacked the enemy 1,200 strong, but without success, the battalion losing 6 men killed, 20 wounded and 17 captured. In October a detachment of the regiment, with a portion of the 4th cavalry, numbering in all 250 men, was completely surrounded near Lexington by John Morgan's forces and after an obstinate resistance was compelled to yield to superior numbers. During the first day's fight at Stone's river the regiment was actively engaged and suffered considerable loss. On the second day it left the field to escort a train of 4,000 wagons to Nashville for supplies. The train was attacked at Stewart's creek by Wheeler's Confederate cavalry and the regiment, supported by the 10th Ohio infantry, repulsed the Confederates with severe loss. After the battle of Stone's river the regiment was sent in pursuit of the enemy, and near Middleton, Tenn., attacked his rear-guard, capturing one of his trains. During the battle of Chickamauga it occupied a position at Lafayette, on the extreme left of the Federal lines, where it was attacked by the Confederates and forced back to Charleston, Tenn. After the battle the regiment moved as the advance of Gen. Crook's forces in pursuit of Wheeler's cavalry through Tennessee, engaging them at McMinnville and on the Shelbyville pike. The latter engagement was a handsome and successful cavalry fight, in which Wheeler's forces were completely routed and demoralized, large numbers of the Confederates being killed and captured, while the regiment lost but 2 men killed and 23 captured. In Jan., 1864, the regiment reenlisted and on the expiration of the 30-days' furlough returned to duty. Through the efforts of Maj. Charles W. Skinner and Capt. E. M. Colver nearly 1,000 recruits were enlisted and on its return to the front at Nashville, the regiment numbered over 1,500 strong. In May it was engaged at Courtland, Ala., with the Confederate Gen. Roddey's command, the Confederates being routed with the loss of upward of 30 men killed and wounded. At Moulton the regiment was attacked by the same force in camp before daylight, and although partially surprised, it rallied, drove the enemy from the field, and pursued him. Reaching Rome, the regiment was assigned to a position on the left flank of Sherman's army and participated in the engagements at Noonday creek and Kennesaw mountain. After crossing the Chattahoochee river it was engaged in the battle of Peachtree creek. In the flanking movements on Jonesboro it was in Gen. Garrard's cavalry division and was the first to attack the enemy's forces at Lovejoy's Station, taking possession of the railroad. In the first battle of Franklin, Tenn., the regiment occupied a position on the left of Gen. Thomas' forces and was engaged with the Confederate cavalry. It was then engaged in the Wilson raid through Alabama and Georgia and in the battles of Selma, Ala., and Macon, Ga. In the engagament at Selma it lost heavily in killed and wounded. The regiment was mustered out on Aug. 4, 1865.

Footnotes:
Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 2

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